Monthly Archives: April 2016

Level Entry Systems

Safepath EntryLevel™ Wheelchair Ramps

Safepath EntryLevel™ Wheelchair Ramps

While having a level area to use at the top of a ramp when trying to access a building via its doorways seems like a no brainer, situations where the threshold rise is only 1, 2 or even 3 inches are often dealt with using a simple threshold ramp. In the USA the accessibility regulations now require that even for these low rises that there be a level area in front of the doorway of buildings.

It really does make sense that this level area be available regardless of the rise. Trying to manipulate a door and pass through it using a wheelchair is hard enough without having to deal with gravity pushing you back down the slope whether it’s a 30′ modular ramp or a 3 foot threshold ramp.

How to create these level areas are up to the building owner. They can pour concrete and create sloped access to the platform, they can create the platform out of wood and use threshold type ramps to access the platform, or they can purchase a level entry ramping system that is installed over the existing sidewalk or porch.

I’ve put together a short article on these level entry systems at https://mobilitybasics.ca/wheelchair-ramps/entry-ramps for those who would like more information.

Re-Animating Limbs

This is a little different but I thought it was worth sharing with visitors. I came across this article in the CBC.ca website about a man who suffers from quadriplegia and can now, with the help of a computer and other hardware, move his hand in a controlled manner. It’s not a cure or a fix for paralysis but it is a step towards a solution.

As I understand it, a person with spinal cord injury will often be able to send a signal from their brain to make a movement and the limb, that they want to move, will be able to accept the signal but the problem is, the signal stops at the location of the spinal injury. Right now they’ve connected this fellow’s brain to a computer so that when he sends the signal to move the computer processes the signal and sends it, using wires, to sensors on the person’s arm. When the arm receives the signal it moves.

So basically, what they have done is created a new route from the brain to the arm muscles to enable movement. The eventual goal is to create a new biological route for the brain signals to take to reach the muscles that bypass the injury.

It’s not as simple as it might seem. The person has to train themselves to think about the movement consciously and has to be connected to a computer to make it work but it seems to be a step to figuring out how to get the signals from the brain and to the muscles in cases where the pathway has been cut by an injury.

This is not, and as far as I know, will never be an option for those who suffer from paraplegia or quadriplegia due to disease and it’s not something that will provide a solution to people who suffer from these conditions in the near future.

For more information see the CBC story at: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/quadriplegia-hand-wrist-movements-1.3533731

 

Medical Equipment Glossary

glossary imageWhen people first get involved in researching and buying home medical equipment they will begin hearing words, terms and phrases that they probably have never heard before.

For this reason I’ve created a glossary page in the article section of the Mobility Basics website.

Some of the terms will refer to anatomy, some to equipment, some to services and some to other aspects of the home health care industry. The list is quite long and may be missing some terms or phrases that should be included. I will probably add to it as time goes by and I’m open to suggestions.

If you are in need of the glossary you can visit it at: https://mobilitybasics.ca/articles/medical-glossary

Lever drive wheelchair for all terrains

Willgo Wheelchair

Willgo Wheelchair

I came across this TED video these morning and thought our visitors might be interested in seeing it.

It’s a short talk about how a fellow from MIT in the US came up with a design for an all terrain wheelchair that can be inexpensively manufactured and will meet the needs of people who live in places like Africa, India and other third world areas. The video is a bit old but interesting anyway.

The Willgo Wheelchair pictured is not what the video is about but the principle of using levers to propel a wheelchair is similar. The Willgo has been in the new and unique products section of my site since August of 2012.