Category Archives: Uncategorized

Turning Seats Update

I’ve just updated the turning seat section of Mobilitybasics.ca with information on a couple of products from a Canadian company, Adapt Solutions.


XL-Base

XL-Base

XL-Base


The first product is for their XL-Base. The Xl-Base converts a conventional van seat into a turning seat that will turn and lower users out of the van and features a manual backup system in case of lose of power or malfunction.

The XL-Base reuses the original van seat and mounting holes so that no damage or modifications are done to the van that will affect the resale value of the van.

This turning seat system can be mounted in either the front or mid passenger position of most of todays popular minivans.
Click here for more information on the XL-Base


XL-Seat

XL-Seat

XL-Seat


The second product is the XL-Seat which is a transfer device that aids wheelchair users in accessing and exiting the front seats of vans, pickup trucks, SUVs and some crossovers.

The XL-Set folds up between the seat and the door when not in use and the transfer board part of it is removable for easier access by people who don’t need a transfer device.

The XL-Seat is mounted using existing the vehicle seat mounting system and does not damage or modify the vehicle in any permanent way.

Click here for more information on the XL-Seat

Vehicle Tie Down Systems

Tie downs image

Q’Straint Strap System

A new page has been added to the vehicle equipment section that provides some general information about both strap type and docking device type tie down systems.

Tie downs are necessary to protect wheelchair users and passengers in van while driving.

For more information about vehicle ties downs visit: Vehicle Tie Down Systems

Driving Controls Information

I’ve just finished a page on the variety of types of driving controls available for those who have physical limitations that make driving difficult, or impossible, in conventionally equipped vehicles.

Products covered include:

901 Hand Controls

Hand Controls

  • Hand controls – Allow people without the use of their legs to drive
  • Spinner knobs – Used in conjunction with hand controls for one handed steering
  • Left foot gas pedals – Allows people who do not have the use of their right feet to drive
  • Pedal extenders – Allow anyone who has difficulty reaching the gas & brake pedals to drive
  • Pedal guards – prevent accidental contact with the pedals by drivers using hand controls
  • Turn signal extensions – Allow people who can’t reach the signal switch options for positioning
  • Parking brake extensions – Make reaching and using parking brakes easier
  • Gear shift extenders – Make reaching and using gear shifts easier

More information on driving controls

Turning Seats

Vehicle Turning Seats

Vehicle Turning Seats


After a bit of a hiatus from adding new content to the Mobility Basics website I’ve added a new section about turning seats for vehicles

Turning seats aid a user accessing a vehicle by turning out of the vehicle and in some cases lowering down to make accessing higher vehicles easier.

The turning seat section of the mobility Basics website is part of a larger project I’m working on that will, in the end, provide a lot of information about vehicle products and adaptations.

SENSIMAT Pressure Management System

I’ve added an article on the Canadian made SENSIMAT Pressure Management System for wheelchair users. This system does not directly manage pressures experienced by users but provides data that will enable the user to modify their habits and actions to minimize the risk of developing pressure sores.

This product has the potential to help wheelchair users to minimize and possibly prevent pressure sores developed by long periods of sitting in their wheelchairs.

The SENSIMAT can alert users when they should be shifting their weight, track and record pressures throughout the day and even allow medical professionals to access the data remotely to see how their patients are doing.

For more information about the SENSIMAT Pressure Management System see the article at: mobilitybasics.ca/sensimat-pressure-sensing-system

Evacuscape Rescue Chair

Evacuscape Rescue Chair ImageI’ve added the Evacuscape Evacuation Chair to the New and Unique Products section of the MobilityBasics.ca website.

The Evacuscape rescue chair is a lightweight wheeled chair that caregivers and emergency workers can use to transport mobility impaired people down staircases in the case of an emergency where the elevators can not be used.

The use of an evacuation chair reduces the chances of injury for both the user and those assisting in their evacuation.

New Products Added

I’ve just added two new products from ConvertaStep to the New and Unique Products section of the website.
Welcome Mat Ramp
The first product is a Welcome Mat Ramp the lifts to create a threshold ramp when needed by wheelchair and scooter users. Its available in three sizes for thresholds up to 8″ high and can be purchased as a motorised version for those who aren’t able to lift the ramp.
ConvertaStep Lift
The second product is the ConvertaStep Lift that is a simple little lift to allow people to access porches and decks up to 33″ high without the need of a huge ramp or expensive porch lift.

Paul Smith, Typewriter Artist

Paul Smith (1922 – 2007) was a sufferer of cerebral palsy who figured out that he could create amazing works of art using only ten of the symbol keys found on a standard typewriter.

Smith lived in the Rose Haven Nursing Center in Oregon from 1967 until 2007
where his work remains posted in the hallways of his old home with the people he considered his family for the latter half of his life.

Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Smith and his artistic talents. I just came across this video today and was blown away by the work Paul created throughout his life.

Scooters, Wheelchairs and Roads

I live in a small village in South Central Ontario and things are pretty lax around here. Many people walk on the road instead of the sidewalks (not sure why).

In our village we have a group of about half a dozen scooter users and a couple of wheelchair users who think they are driving cars. In spite of sidewalks that are cut down to allow access for mobility product users these people always drive on the roads and to make matters worse they tend to drive on the right side with the traffic approaching them from the rear.

While things are pretty lax around here and vehicle drivers, for the most part, are pretty careful and drive at reasonable speeds, the Trans Canada Highway goes through the middle of town and is the most dangerous roadway in the area due to large trucks and trailers and people just trying to get through the village quickly and get back to highway speeds. And still these people drive on the road with their backs to traffic.  Continue reading